Lydia Wilson

Lydia Wilson

Contributing Editor

Lydia Wilson is a contributing editor at Newlines. She is also a research associate at the University of Cambridge’s Computer Lab, and a research fellow at the Centre for the Resolution of Intractable Conflict at the University of Oxford. She is an editor for the Cambridge Literary Review and the presenter of BBC series: “The Secret History of Writing.”

Latest from Lydia Wilson

Gone to Waste: the ‘CVE’ Industry After 9/11

Gone to Waste: the ‘CVE’ Industry After 9/11

After the rise of the Islamic State, I was part of this race for cash, working on CVE projects from media messaging to radicalization research, and it slowly dawned on me how flawed the industry is. Not only has expertise been invented to snag funding, but existing development work has been molded into the shape of “CVE,” stigmatizing entire communities as terrorist-producing.

Lydia Wilson
In a Sea of Broken Glass, Beirut Museums Work to Preserve Their Antiquities

In a Sea of Broken Glass, Beirut Museums Work to Preserve Their Antiquities

After the explosion last August, help poured in from volunteers and international organizations. The city has been healing slowly, but with the country’s economic and political crises, efforts are stalling.

Lydia Wilson
‘Everyone is Hamzah’

‘Everyone is Hamzah’

This week in Jordan sees the start of a trial for sedition and incitement, with charges brought against a member of the royal family and a formerly trusted adviser to the king, and the king’s half-brother Prince Hamzah taking the stand as a witness. Lydia Wilson uncovers how this unprecedented threat of instability to the kingdom feels to Jordanians.

Lydia Wilson
Prince Hassan’s Progress

Prince Hassan’s Progress

Prince Hassan bin Talal, ex-Crown Prince of Jordan, has no “delusions of grandeur” for himself but plenty of ambitious plans for his country. He talks to Newlines about his vision for a more participatory system in which the legion problems facing both the planet and human societies are addressed together.

Lydia Wilson
The Promising Young Women of Syria

The Promising Young Women of Syria

Ten years ago, war shattered the hopes of many Syrians. But none have suffered quite like the women. Lydia Wilson writes about what it is like to be a young woman in Syria today, facing mundane hardships, greater responsibility, and diminished prospects.

Lydia Wilson
Syria’s Famished Victory

Syria’s Famished Victory

Food, especially in a country so famous for its cuisine, is not just about nutrition; it is also about culture. What do you do when you can’t afford the food? You stop inviting people, apart from the ones you don’t feel embarrassed in front of when you can only serve coffee.

Lydia Wilson
The Riddle of the Sinai Sphinx

The Riddle of the Sinai Sphinx

A small sphinx in the Sinai’s Temple of Hathor had carried a riddle for millennia. In solving it, archaeologists discovered how turquoise miners from the East had replaced hieroglyphs with letters and invented the alphabet.

Lydia Wilson