Logo

United Kingdom

Britain’s Boring Election? — With Lydia Wilson

Britain’s Boring Election? — With Lydia Wilson

New Lines Culture Editor Lydia Wilson and Global Insights host Kwangu Liwewe discuss the upcoming election in the United Kingdom which, despite potentially heralding a change in government for the first time in 14 years, seems to be a bit … boring?

The Postwar Revival of British Fascism

Postwar Britain’s Fascist Surge

In 1946, years of war against the Axis powers had affected every man, woman and child in the U.K. Yet violence from Zionist paramilitary groups in Mandatory Palestine provided the opening for a campaign of antisemitism and a brief revival of Britain's own fascist movement.

The Roots of Anger at Britain’s Migrant Barge

The Roots of Anger at Britain’s Migrant Barge

But many residents of Portland don’t see it as a national saving but rather an imposition on a small town of 13,500. They complained that London chose to dock the barge on their shores because they were too far away as well as too small and too economically weak for their voices to be heard in the capital. There have been protests against the barge and counter protests against these protests. The opposition to asylum seekers here is emblematic of the larger opposition they face elsewhere in the U.K. and in Europe but with its particular set of local grievances that have contributed to an anti-refugee sentiment.

Making the Music for King Charles III’s Coronation

Making the Music for King Charles III’s Coronation

This dual function of church music, for both private worship and common enjoyment, could be a metaphor for the coronation itself, in its mix of the most extravagantly public gestures combined with private moments between clergy and king — one entirely hidden behind the “anointing screen,” another the personal act of taking Communion.

I Read All the Kids’ Coronation Books So You Don’t Have To

I Read All the Kids’ Coronation Books So You Don’t Have To

Reading the books, I was struck with their projection of a certain kind of Britishness. This is a country where its layfolk are forelock-tugging, deferential and tradition-loving. It is multicultural but only when it comes to those on the streets cheering on the king and queen as they ride down The Mall leading up to Buckingham Palace on coronation day in a gilded carriage.

Ahead of the British Coronation, an Indian Jewel Takes Center Stage (or Not)

Ahead of the British Coronation, an Indian Jewel Takes Center Stage (or Not)

Ahead of King Charles III’s coronation, the Kohinoor diamond, possibly the most infamous and divisive stone in history, has once again come under the limelight, this time due to its absence from the ceremony. However, questions about its repatriation have made a comeback, as always.

How Prince Naseem Hamed Shaped British Identity

How Prince Naseem Hamed Shaped British Identity

For a brief moment in the pre-9/11 world, the boxer known as Prince Naseem became an argument for what multiculturalism could look like and, later, a lament for what could have been, in the U.K. and beyond.