Reportage

The Death of Haiti’s President Summons Ghosts Old and New

The Death of Haiti’s President Summons Ghosts Old and New

Former Haiti president Moïse is gone, but the system that he was part of and ostensibly was fighting against, made of blood and bone, both predated him and will outlast him.

A New Syria in the South of Turkey

A New Syria in the South of Turkey

Before 2011, Reyhanli had about 90,000 inhabitants. Ten years later, the figure is almost 250,000. The new residents from the south are so numerous that a new neighborhood was built in the city. It’s called Yeni Sehir, which translates to the New City, and it is larger than the old one.

Pakistan Schools to Re-Open Amid a Controversial New Curriculum Rollout

Pakistan Schools to Re-Open Amid a Controversial New Curriculum Rollout

Under the banner of “One Nation, One Curriculum,” the new curriculum pushes to teach more Urdu, bolster Islamic teachings and, perhaps an unintended consequence, triple the price of textbooks.

Anmol Irfan
In Srebrenica’s Darkest Hour, a Videographer Shone a Light

In Srebrenica’s Darkest Hour, a Videographer Shone a Light

The footage of “the videographer of Srebrenica” has become the locus for online connections among Bosniaks. They remember the pain of the Bosnian genocide, but also love and solidarity.

Riada Asimovic Akyol
Exclusive: Western Intelligence Fears New Russian Sat-Nav’s Espionage Capabilities

Exclusive: Western Intelligence Fears New Russian Sat-Nav’s Espionage Capabilities

Russia is preparing to introduce a new generation of its GLONASS satellite navigation system, with expanded global infrastructure. Several Western intelligence agencies say the program is also being used to conduct high-level espionage.

Holger Roonemaa,
Michael Weiss
Is Israel’s ‘Government of Change’ More of the Same?

Is Israel’s ‘Government of Change’ More of the Same?

Israel’s so-called government of change pledged to avoid controversial issues to ensure that the coalition remains afloat. But Israel’s settlement lobby has settled deeper and more irrevocably into the heart of power.

Jonathan Shamir
As Turkish As I Want To Be

As Turkish As I Want To Be

“My baba left,” I would say to friends, who were still a little mystified I had moved by choice, “and now I’ve come back.” I could never stop myself from saying “back.” In a way, it makes no sense. I had never lived in Turkey before. But it acknowledges something that feels true: that the arcs of our stories stretch beyond our own lifetimes.

Sami Kent