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Syria

The ‘Echo Chamber’ of Syrian Chemical Weapons Conspiracy Theorists

Inside the Pro-Assad ‘Echo Chamber’

The real issue here is not so much the denial of chemical attacks as the way it serves as a vehicle for normalizing conspiracy theories under the guise of critical thinking. Admirable though it is to view news reports and government statements with caution and scrutinize the evidence, the denial campaign was something else, encouraging people to reject information at will simply because it didn't fit their view of how the world works.

A Once Powerful Patriarch Returns to an Unrecognizable Syria

Return of the Prodigal Uncle

For decades, whenever Rifaat came back to Damascus, there was something that he wanted. But by the time he returned to Damascus weeks ago, Syria had moved far beyond all of his former positions and wishes.

Eid in Idlib

Eid in Idlib

Photojournalist Fared al Mahlool took these photos of Idlib over the eve and morning of Eid. They show that the battered province is a safe haven mainly for men, women, and children, who take the same joy in new clothes, good food, carnival-rides, and candy as we all do. Their smiles are a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.

Fared Al Mahlool
Syria: The Bashar Years

Syria: The Bashar Years

In this wide-ranging podcast, the writer and political analyst Rime Allaf recalls the death of Hafez al-Assad in Syria and traces the years of his son’s rule, from the Lebanon occupation to the Syrian revolution.

New Lines Podcast
What They Don’t Teach You In Medical School

What They Don’t Teach You In Medical School

Syrians are caught between the overt violence of barrel bombs and covert killing through hunger and enforced privation. Syria has exposed the fragility of international norms. Words have not alleviated its people’s suffering. Only action can give meaning to the words.

Dr. Mohammed Zaher Sahloul
Shooting the War in Syria

Shooting the War in Syria

Although the aftermath of the war in Syria continues, artworks that repurpose photographs of the war may contribute to a renewed narrative. Art makes the viewer reflect on time and all the opportunities lost. Eventually, perhaps, the art helps us make sense of the war.

Olympe Lemut
The Wandering Alawite

The Wandering Alawite

Syria's Alawite minority have always been painfully aware of the fragility of sectarian coexistence. Many of us preferred one dictator, Bashar al-Assad, to a Syria broken into multiple sectarian dictatorships. So, despite reservations, despite its repression, we still stuck by the regime.

Adnan Younes