Logo

immigration

Even After Decades, Europe’s Turkish Diaspora Struggles for Recognition

Europe’s Turkish Diaspora

Today, Turkish diaspora communities encompassing roughly 5.5 million people are spread across Europe, forming one of the continent’s largest migrant groups and the largest Muslim-majority community. But 60 years and at least four generations later, many people from the Turkish diaspora still feel like second-class citizens in Europe.

Why Are Iraqi Kurds Fleeing to Europe?

Why Kurds Go to Europe

Just as in the rest of Iraq and the wider region, the Kurdish model has failed to resolve deep social, political and economic issues by mere nationalistic thinking and slogans. The ongoing mass Kurdish exodus to Europe through Belarus is a clear example of this failure.

A New Syria in the South of Turkey

A New Syria in the South of Turkey

Before 2011, Reyhanli had about 90,000 inhabitants. Ten years later, the figure is almost 250,000. The new residents from the south are so numerous that a new neighborhood was built in the city. It’s called Yeni Sehir, which translates to the New City, and it is larger than the old one.

America is Abandoning Afghan Translators to the Taliban

America is Abandoning Afghan Translators to the Taliban

Afghan translators face deadly violence from the Taliban after the US withdraws in a matter of months. Yet the program designed to help them relocate to the US is a shambles, and many are dying while waiting for an answer.

‘I Will Kill Myself’: The Enduring Nightmare of Lebanon’s Kafala System

‘I Will Kill Myself’: The Enduring Nightmare of Lebanon’s Kafala System

The hours felt endless. Hours “where you wonder why they took your documents, kept your mobile phone, and then you realize, only a few weeks later, that it is their way of controlling you. They got you, they can blackmail you, you are their merchandise.”

The Invisible Lines that Break Our Hearts

The Invisible Lines that Break Our Hearts

Five years, three countries, and a pile of immigration paperwork later, I can honestly say that borders have shaped, challenged, and strengthened our love for one another. Still, I know that borders could have just as easily broken us.

Swastikas in Damascus

Swastikas in Damascus

A death notice appeared in a Lebanese village north of Beirut last September of a man with a curious first name. It took me back to my school days in Syria and the unusual interest many of my fellow schoolboys had in the history of the Second World War.