Al Qaeda

What the Global War on Terror Really Accomplished

What the Global War on Terror Really Accomplished

Contrary to how some understand the U.S. withdrawal in Afghanistan, the lesson extremists are taking from the Taliban’s success is not simply that jihad works, but that diplomacy and engagement are a necessary part of the process, which includes reassuring the West about external threats emerging from their areas.

In Second Regime, Both the Taliban and the World Face a New Reality

Both the Taliban and the World Face a New Reality

Afghanistan itself was a sideshow in which money and careers could be made and repatriated. In the meantime, an artificial economy was created there to service birds of passage, from diplomats and aid workers to military officials and outside contractors.

How America Lost Afghanistan

How America Lost Afghanistan

Over its 10 years of aiding the mujahedeen, the U.S. learned nothing about the nuances of Afghanistan’s people, history or culture — a problem that would continue to plague most of our actions for the 20 years the U.S. spent in Afghanistan.

Thomas H. Johnson,
Larry P. Goodson
What the CIA Did (and Didn’t Do) in Soviet-Occupied Afghanistan

What the CIA Did (and Didn’t Do) in Soviet-Occupied Afghanistan

Western leftists think the CIA created al Qaeda by helping the mujahideen shoot down Russian helicopters. They’re wrong. The CIA program to arm anti-Soviet Afghan mujahideen with Stinger missiles saved lives.

Emran Feroz
Jailing Jihadists in the West

Jailing Jihadists in the West

Western prison systems still struggle to incarcerate notorious jihadists or ideologues. One major case was that of Abu Qatada, dubbed “Osama bin Laden’s right-hand man.”

Tam Hussein
Revolutionary Wit

Revolutionary Wit

No one escaped Raed Fares’ brutal criticism: U.S. presidents, Russia, Iran, the United Nations – everyone who was witnessing the Syrian war and doing nothing to stop it.

Lina Sergie Attar