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Kevin Blankinship

Kevin Blankinship

Contributing Editor

Kevin Blankinship is a contributing editor at New Lines magazine. He is an assistant professor of Arabic at Brigham Young University. His writing has appeared in The Atlantic, the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Spectator, The Times Literary Supplement, and more.

Latest from Kevin Blankinship

Middle East Myths and Monsters Reveal Our Humanity

Middle East Myths and Monsters Reveal Our Humanity

Middle East folklore is full of jinn, giants and ghouls. These creatures seem far from human, but in fact they reveal, by contrast, what being human really means. They’re a shrine to the sneaking suspicion that ours isn’t the only reality that exists and that other realities bleed into our own.

Kevin Blankinship
‘Three Thousand Years’ and the History of Middle East Tales

‘Three Thousand Years’ and the History of Middle East Tales

During a conference in Istanbul, professor Alithea Binnie meets a trapped djinn who offers three wishes in exchange for his freedom. Thus begins a series of adventures that don’t go farther than Alithea’s hotel room and yet will change her life forever.

Kevin Blankinship
The Film ‘Network’ Darkly Predicted Our Paranoid Politics

The Film ‘Network’ Darkly Predicted Our Paranoid Politics

In the 1976 film “Network,” a struggling TV company exploits the paranoia of one of its anchors to create a hit show, thus manipulating the American public in the tumult of the 1970s and foreshadowing our own polarized era.

Kevin Blankinship
The Legacy of Humphrey Davies Shows a Love for Translation but Also for Translators

The Legacy of Humphrey Davies Shows a Love for Translation but Also for Translators

British translator Humphrey Davies, who passed away on Nov. 12, gifted dozens of English literary translations from Arabic but also a legacy of mentorship and warmth.

Kevin Blankinship
Women Warriors of the Early Muslim World

Women Warriors of the Early Muslim World

Hind marched with Quraysh to battle, then stormed the field with other women to mutilate the corpses of the Muslims, slashing off noses and ears and fashioning them into necklaces. It’s said that she gouged out the liver of Muhammad’s uncle Hamza and bit into it.

Kevin Blankinship
The Seven Hanging Odes of Mecca

The Seven Hanging Odes of Mecca

Seven ancient Arabic odes are still unknown to the West despite having a bedrock status as “Beowulf” does in English: the mu’allaqat or hanging odes, so-called because they were allegedly stitched in gold and draped on the shrine of the Kaaba at Mecca as masterpieces.

Kevin Blankinship