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Amie Ferris-Rotman

Amie Ferris-Rotman

Global News Editor

Amie Ferris-Rotman is Global News Editor at New Lines magazine. She is an editor, journalist and media innovator, who has worked mainly for the Washington Post, Reuters and the Wall Street Journal. Amie grew up in London and the United States.

She has reported from across Russia and the surrounding countries for a decade. As a contributor to TIME magazine, she has reported on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, from the unlikely characters joining Ukraine’s fight to Kyiv’s campaign to hold Moscow accountable for mass rape. While she was Moscow correspondent for the Washington Post, she was the first reporter to meet the children of ISIS fighters welcomed back by the Russian state, and conducted an award-winning investigation into the treatment of ethnically Kazakh women by the Chinese government in internment camps. As special projects editor at the D.C.-based nonprofit newsroom The Fuller Project, Amie oversaw and commissioned ambitious, enterprise stories on the pandemic’s effect on global supply chains and labor rights.

Her other main area of interest is Afghanistan, where she was Reuters senior correspondent during the height of the U.S.-led war. She has continued to report on the fall of Kabul and what this means for the women of Afghanistan, including for The Guardian, where she met Afghan women MPs as they formed their parliament in exile in Athens, to the TIME cover story for the one-year anniversary of the Taliban takeover, where she was the project lead on a multi-month, many-country feature documenting the lives of Afghan refugees around the world. Amie has also reported for Foreign Policy magazine.

Amie believes the best journalism can come from those who report on their own communities. After her 2014 John S. Knight Fellowship at Stanford University, Amie founded Sahar Speaks, a program offering training and publishing opportunities for Afghan female journalists. This won her the British Press Award for Innovation in 2016. She holds a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in Russian Studies from University College London, which explains her ever-expanding collection of Soviet film posters.

Amie welcomes pitches on Afghanistan, Russia, Ukraine, the Caucasus and Central Asia. She is particularly interested in people and movements that are often overlooked and issues that impact women.

Latest from Amie Ferris-Rotman

As Protests Erupt Over Putin’s Draft, a More Ominous Threat Surfaces

As Protests Erupt Over Putin’s Draft, a More Ominous Threat Surfaces

Demonstrators are organizing large protests to take place after Friday prayers on Sept. 30. “Invaders do not become martyrs,” one poster says. People in the North Caucasus are acutely aware of what a Russian invasion feels like, even today. The 19th-century, anti-colonial war against tsarist forces, which raged for almost 50 years, took a terrible toll on the highlanders and still influences the modern mindset; there is scarcely a Dagestani home or family that does not have a portrait of the warrior Imam Shamil, the freedom fighter who took on imperial Russia.

Amie Ferris-Rotman