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Netflix’s Perfect Strangers Has More Truth in It Than Its Critics Allow

Moral Panic Over Arabic Netflix Movie

It creates a kind of societal schizophrenia in which people are publicly outraged over artists’ failure to adhere to the moral imperatives of their faith and cultural values but Muslim countries lead the world in Google searches for porn.

Netflix’s ‘Grace and Frankie’ Reveals a Trend: Women Rejecting Marriage in Golden Years

‘Grace and Frankie’ and the Virtues of Divorce

The Netflix series “Grace and Frankie” portrays two women who suddenly find themselves divorced in their 70s. Instead of remarrying, they enjoy the single life, something more and more boomer women do as they acknowledge the high costs of marriage.

‘The Club’: Netflix’s Sephardic Heroine Braves Turkey’s Troubled Past

‘The Club’: Netflix’s Sephardic Heroine Braves Turkey’s Troubled Past

“The Club” also offers a biting social critique. For the show is less about the arrival of cocktail modernity to Istanbul than about the Turkification of cocktail modernity, i.e., a pincer movement by Kemalist state and society to substitute good secular Muslim Turks for Istanbul’s Greeks, Jews and Armenians.

Evan Pheiffer
An Unlikely Smash Hit, Netflix’s ‘Squid Game’ Exposes the Dark Side of Free Enterprise

An Unlikely Smash Hit, Netflix’s ‘Squid Game’ Exposes the Dark Side of Free Enterprise

The smash Netflix series “Squid Game” shows the material hardship of those trampled by the free market system, but more than that, it shows what that system does for compassion: If your goal is to win, you must become heartless.

Lisa Lagace
In Lucifer, We Find Sympathy for the Devil

In Lucifer, We Find Sympathy for the Devil

Ultimately, all the devil and his top demon want is to make a meaningful human connection. They feel tormented at the possibility that they may be incapable of such a thing after having spent eons in hell. And who could blame them?

Rasha Elass
Inglourious Basterds of Mosul

Inglourious Basterds of Mosul

It took five hours to watch the 101-minute Netflix film on Mosul and process the emotions that resulted from the realistic portrayal of brutal warfare in my hometown.

Rasha Al Aqeedi