Assad

The Day the World Stood Still

The Day the World Stood Still

On August 21, 2013 the Syrian regime launched the biggest chemical attack of the 21st century. It was a seismic event whose repercussions are still being felt. This is an account of what happened that day and how the decisions made in its aftermath sealed Syria’s fate.

Apologists Call Assad Secular. Assad Tells Syrians Otherwise

Assad’s Sham Secularism

“What is the difference between a human and an animal?” Assad said. “Humans have feelings and animals have feelings. … Humans speak and parrots speak … animals have brains and they learn. … The difference between a human and an animal is just one thing that human beings have: creed.”

Between Insurrection and Revolution

Between Insurrection and Revolution

Years later, after leaving the country and then returning as a journalist, I would ask fellow Syrians what they understood themselves to be. “What is Syria? Who is Syria?” I asked anyone who listened. “What does it mean to be a citizen of Syria?”

Rasha Elass
The Peril of War Correspondence

The Peril of War Correspondence

If and when freedom arrives, the moment surprises you, and you find yourself in the world again holding more emotion than you know how to express.

Michael Scott Moore
Cracks in the Assad Facade

Cracks in the Assad Facade

The death of Syria's foreign minister was tragic to many regime sympathizers. They now witness in horror the decline of the old guard and the rise of the warlords as one of the defining features of Bashar al-Assad’s proclaimed victory over a shattered Syria.

Asser Khattab
‘It’s like Judgment Day’: Syrians Recount Horror of an Underreported COVID-19 Outbreak

‘It’s like Judgment Day’: Syrians Recount Horror of an Underreported COVID-19 Outbreak

Syrians ravaged by war are now dying from a pandemic the government has downplayed.

Asser Khattab
On the Streets of Damascus

On the Streets of Damascus

I reported from the Syrian capital when a peaceful protest movement became an armed insurgency. Here's what I saw.

Clarissa Ward