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Iran Fatwa: the Meaning of the Attack on Salman Rushdie

Iran Fatwa: the Meaning of the Attack on Salman Rushdie

Since the attack on the novelist, Iran’s newspapers have kept up a steady stream of invective against Rushdie. To understand why Tehran persists in criticizing Rushdie even after the death of Khomeini, it is essential to understand where the fatwa sits in its current identity.

Qeema Confidential

Qeema Confidential

Food patterns in Arab-majority countries draw on influences from the rich cuisines of India, Persia and the Ottoman Empire. The latter includes foods from Greece, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia and other former Ottoman regions.

Love, Life and Hope: Returning to Help the Women of Afghanistan

Love, Life and Hope: Returning to Help the Women of Afghanistan

I knew how lucky I was to have other options, to be able to make the choice to leave a war without being a refugee. I had been given a Special Immigrant Visa for the U.S. and left Afghanistan in 2016, still haunted by guilt. I studied at college in Virginia. I wanted to pursue a career in education that would one day help me make more substantial changes in Afghanistan. I went on to study at Georgetown and Columbia universities and continued to tell myself that all of this was in aid of my life’s mission to work for, and with, Afghan women. But who knows when I will be able to return to Herat or Kabul now?

One Year After the Fall of Kabul – with Fazelminallah Qazizai

One Year After the Fall of Kabul – with Fazelminallah Qazizai

One year after the fall of Kabul, this special anniversary episode of The Lede looks back on the momentous events of Aug. 15, 2021, and explores how Afghanistan has fared in their aftermath. Featuring Fazelminallah Qazizai, Nazila Jamshidi and Chris Sands, alongside hosts Rasha Elass and Faisal Al Yafai.

When Uganda Expelled Its Asian Population in 1972, Britain Tried to Exclude Them

When Uganda Expelled Its Asian Population in 1972, Britain Tried to Exclude Them

Britain’s response to the expulsion of Ugandan Asians 50 years ago has been celebrated as demonstrating great generosity. Yet little is said about Britain’s attempts to prevent Ugandan Asians from coming to Britain, legal cases submitted to the European Commission of Human Rights or the newspaper advertisements taken out to warn Ugandan Asians not to settle in Leicester, even though these people were British passport holders. To say that Ugandan Asians were readily and warmly welcomed in 1970s Britain would be to offer a distorted history of immigration and asylum.