Europe

The Booksellers of Kabul

The Booksellers of Kabul

It’s fate that two former enemies ended up selling books together. But a sense of foreboding prevails about what lies ahead once the Taliban and the Afghan National Army join mortal combat without foreign forces as a buffer.

Germany’s ‘Gray Wolves’ and Turkish Radicalization

Turkish 'Gray Wolves' Haunt Europe

Calls within the EU to designate the Ülkü Ocaklari, also known by the moniker “Gray Wolves,” as a terrorist group are portrayed as a crackdown on Turkish far-right extremism. But it raises questions on broader issues about assimilation and inclusion of Turkish immigrants in Europe.

The Invisible Lines that Break Our Hearts

The Invisible Lines that Break Our Hearts

Five years, three countries, and a pile of immigration paperwork later, I can honestly say that borders have shaped, challenged, and strengthened our love for one another. Still, I know that borders could have just as easily broken us.

Anna Lekas Miller
Czechs and Imbalances

Czechs and Imbalances

But then there’s the awkward fact that the Czechs themselves have, by their own admission, played a strong hand incredibly poorly, owing largely to the fact that high-profile members of their political establishment are more eager to represent Moscow’s interests over Prague’s.

Michael Weiss,
Holger Roonemaa
The Balkan Roots of the Far Right’s “Great Replacement” Theory

The Balkan Roots of the Far Right’s “Great Replacement” Theory

The turn toward paranoid identity politics and demographic fetishism among ostensibly center-right parties on both sides of the Atlantic readily comports to the ideological discourses developed by Serb nationalists during the 1980s and 1990s.

Jasmin Mujanović
How Godless Arabs Changed Europe

How Godless Arabs Changed Europe

In the world of Islam, some philosophers went against religion. The secularist ideas that European scholars found in these thinkers’ writings shook both Muslim and Christian theologians.

Koert Debeuf