Tripoli

On the Screen, Libyans Learned About Everything but Themselves

On the Screen, Libyans Learned About Everything but Themselves

From California to Cairo, none of the films that featured my country, Libya, could step out of an Orientalist vision of camels, belly dancers, an endless desert and, of course, our iconic “Brother Leader.”

Today’s Libya Won’t Be Easy For Gadhafi’s Son

Today’s Libya Won’t Be Easy For Gadhafi’s Son

In the final years of Moammar Gadhafi’s rule, tensions between the autocrat’s two most prominent sons embodied the key ideological question of how — and if — governance ought to be reformed. The ferocious rivalry contributed to the regime’s disjointed response to the 2011 uprisings — and helped bring about its end.

A Libyan Revenant

A Libyan Revenant

For one militia commander, a battlefield defeat was payback to the aspiring Libyan strongman Gen. Khalifa Haftar. But it also illustrates in stark clarity how the Middle East’s proxy wars and ideological rivalries have spilled across borders, ensnaring both the innocent and not so innocent.

Frederic Wehrey
Libya and the Triumph of the Opportunists

Libya and the Triumph of the Opportunists

Political opportunists can thrive on the penchant of people to long for the old authoritarian system and forget its dark sides. Many Libyans increasingly look back at the stability of the Gadhafi years with some nostalgia, even if they fervently supported the 2011 revolution.

Mieczysław P. Boduszyński
Why There’s Hope for Libya

Why There’s Hope for Libya

Libya now has a unified national government that resulted from a peaceful transition of power and handover by the two rival governments. Two top U.N. envoys to Libya say they could have hardly imagined this development a year ago when they were serving in the United Nations.

Stephanie Williams,
Ghassan Salamé
A Notorious Prison and Libya’s War of Memory

A Notorious Prison and Libya’s War of Memory

Abu Salim was once notorious as the prison where Gadhafi’s opponents were imprisoned, all but forgotten. But in a few short years, conflict has changed the memory of that place and the prison has become embroiled in the contested narratives of post-revolution Libya.

Mary Fitzgerald