Erdogan

Ottoman Feminists and their Struggle in Modern Day Turkey

Ottoman Feminists and their Struggle in Modern Day Turkey

Still today, a majority of the public believes that women were handed their rights on a silver platter. However, according to the rectified version of history, it was in the late 19th century that Muslim women of the Ottoman Empire first started to demand their rights.

The New Kurdish Right

The New Kurdish Right

Within Kurdish politics in Turkey, there is an emerging style of right-wing discourse. No longer content to be a silent partner of the governing Turkish right-wing coalition, the new Kurdish right defines itself in opposition to both the Turkish state and the PKK’s left-liberation mythos.

The Uneasy Alliance Between Putin and Erdogan

The Uneasy Alliance Between Putin and Erdogan

The alliance has proved remarkably enduring, and rarely have Russia and Turkey enjoyed such a stretch of fruitful cooperation. But so much hinges on the personal relationship between Putin and Erdoğan. Not even they can change the brittle nature of a relationship between two powers that have been rivals for centuries.

Stuart Williams
Gen Z’s Political Awakening in Turkey

Gen Z’s Political Awakening in Turkey

Young people in Turkey are still willing to take to the streets and fight for their rights despite the devastating consequences they could face in this increasingly harsh and repressive atmosphere.

Paul Benjamin Osterlund
Turkey’s Chase for the ‘Red Apple’

Turkey’s Chase for the ‘Red Apple’

The Red Apple is a symbol of a vision and quest for modern Turkey — to wield influence and hegemony that extends well beyond its borders into Muslim-majority lands that were formerly ruled by the Ottomans in the Balkans, Middle East, and the Caucasus.

Stuart Williams
The Symbolism of Imperial Power

The Symbolism of Imperial Power

The Hagia Sophia was never simply a place of worship for the Byzantines or the Ottomans. It was a symbol of imperial power and divine authority, and was at the center of what experts call a “religioscape” – a physical landscape of religious structures and paraphernalia.

Nick Ashdown